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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 495917, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/495917
Review Article

Cleansing Formulations That Respect Skin Barrier Integrity

1Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Companies, 199 Grandview Road, Skillman, NJ 08558, USA
2Neutrogena Corporation, 5760 West 96th Street, R&D Building, Los Angeles, CA 90045, USA

Received 25 April 2012; Accepted 25 June 2012

Academic Editor: Georgios Stamatas

Copyright © 2012 Russel M. Walters et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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