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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 359756, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/359756
Research Article

Tamarind Seed Xyloglucans Promote Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Cells through Internalization via Stimulation of Proproliferative Signal Transduction Pathways

Westfalian Wilhelms University of Muenster, Institute for Pharmaceutical Biology and Phytochemistry, Hittorfstraße 56, 48149 Muenster, Germany

Received 14 March 2013; Revised 9 June 2013; Accepted 23 June 2013

Academic Editor: Lajos Kemeny

Copyright © 2013 W. Nie and A. M. Deters. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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