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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 531435, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/531435
Research Article

Efficacy of Chronic Antidepressant Treatments in a New Model of Extreme Anxiety in Rats

1Neuropsychopharmacology Department, ETAP-Applied Ethology, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lés-Nancy, France
2Service Pharmacie, Etablissement Public de Santé Alsace Nord, 67170 Brumath, France
3Laboratoire de Nutrition Génétique et Exposition aux Risques Environnementaux, INSERM U954, Service de Microscopie Electronique, Faculté de Médecine de Nancy, UHP, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, France
4Service de Psychiatrie II, CHU de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France
5Groupe Pharmacologie Moléculaire et Intégrative, Unité de Biochimie Structurale et Cellulaire, Département de Biologie Structurale et Chimie, Institut Pasteur, 75015 Paris, France
6CHUM/St-Luc, Neuroscience Research Unit, 1058 St-Denis Street, Montréal, PQ, Canada H2X 3J4

Received 11 January 2011; Revised 31 May 2011; Accepted 3 June 2011

Academic Editor: Axel Steiger

Copyright © 2011 Hervé Javelot et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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