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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 839743, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/839743
Review Article

Disruption of Circadian Rhythms: A Crucial Factor in the Etiology of Depression

1Departamento de Biología Celular y Fisiología, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04306 México, DF, Mexico
2Departamento de Anatomía, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04306 México, DF, Mexico

Received 31 January 2011; Revised 4 May 2011; Accepted 6 June 2011

Academic Editor: Dietrich van Calker

Copyright © 2011 Roberto Salgado-Delgado et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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