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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 469384, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/469384
Research Article

Effect of Affective Temperaments Assessed by the TEMPS-A on the Relationship between Work-Related Stressors and Depressive Symptoms among Workers in Their Twenties to Forties in Japan

1Department of Nursing, Hyogo University of Health Sciences, 1-3-6 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8530, Japan
2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kanto Medical Center, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone East Corporation, 5-9-22 Higashi-Gotanda, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8625, Japan
3Department of Literature, Atomi University, 1-9-6 Nakano, Niiza-shi, Saitama 352-8501, Japan

Received 17 May 2012; Accepted 2 August 2012

Academic Editor: Jörg Richter

Copyright © 2012 Maki Tei-Tominaga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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