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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 752563, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/752563
Review Article

Roles of PI3K/AKT/GSK3/mTOR Pathway in Cell Signaling of Mental Illnesses

1Department of Environmental Health Science, Nara Women's University, Kita-Uoya Nishimachi, Nara 630-8506, Japan
2Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Nara Women's University, Nara 630-8506, Japan

Received 3 August 2012; Revised 9 November 2012; Accepted 21 November 2012

Academic Editor: Michael Maes

Copyright © 2012 Yasuko Kitagishi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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