Table 2: Commonly adopted strategies for managing sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant drugs. Questionnaire survey, US psychiatrists, expertise in managing sexual dysfunction [41]. Percentages indicate the proportion of physicians using that strategy as their preferred intervention.

DysfunctionMost frequently used treatment strategies first-, second-, and third-line interventions

Impaired libido—men and womenFirst. Adding a dopaminergic agent (37.9%)
Second. Switching to another antidepressant (mostly bupropion) (44.8%)
Third. Switching to another antidepressant (mostly bupropion) (31%)

Impaired arousal—womenFirst. Adding a dopaminergic agent (amantadine, bupropion, stimulants) (37.9%)
Second. Adding a dopaminergic agent (amantadine, bupropion, stimulants) (20.4%)
Third. Switching to another antidepressant (mostly bupropion) (34.5%)

Impaired arousal—menFirst. Adding a dopaminergic agent (mostly stimulants) (31%)
Second. Switching to another antidepressant (mostly bupropion) (31%)
Third (a). Switching to another antidepressant (mostly bupropion) (37.9%)
Third (b). Adding sildenafil, tadalafil, or vardenafil (mostly sildenafil or all three) (37.9%)
(a and b used by equal number of experts as a third choice)

Impaired orgasm—womenFirst. Adding a dopaminergic agent (amantadine, stimulants) (34.5%)
Second. Switching to another antidepressant (mostly bupropion) (31%)
Third. Switching to another antidepressant (mostly bupropion) (27.5%)

Impaired orgasm —menFirst (a). Adding a dopaminergic agent (stimulants) (31%)
First (b). Decreasing the dose of antidepressant (31%)
Second. Switching to another antidepressant (mostly bupropion) (34.5%)
Third. Switching to another antidepressant (mostly bupropion) (31%)
(a and b used by equal number of experts as a first choice)