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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 379645, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/379645
Research Article

Impact of Integrated Amrita Meditation Technique on Adrenaline and Cortisol Levels in Healthy Volunteers

1Department of Physiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Amrita Lane, Ponekkara P.O., Cochin 682 041, Kerala, India
2Department of Biochemistry, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Amrita Lane, Ponekkara P.O., Cochin 682 041, Kerala, India
3Department of Biostatistics, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Amrita Lane, Ponekkara P.O., Cochin 682 041, Kerala, India
4Department of Endocrinology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Amrita Lane, Ponekkara P.O., Cochin 682 041, Kerala, India

Received 9 September 2010; Revised 27 November 2010; Accepted 8 January 2011

Copyright © 2011 Balakrishnan Vandana et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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