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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 619650, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/neq016
Original Article

Serotonin Receptor 2A/C Is Involved in Electroacupuncture Inhibition of Pain in an Osteoarthritis Rat Model

1Center for Integrative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
2Department of Neurobiology, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001, Shanxi, PR, China
3Department of Neural and Pain Sciences, Dental School, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Received 16 September 2009; Accepted 8 February 2010

Copyright © 2011 Aihui Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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