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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 124703, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/124703
Review Article

Effects of Yoga Interventions on Fatigue: A Meta-Analysis

Center for Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Witten/Herdecke, 58239 Herdecke, Germany

Received 5 June 2012; Revised 25 July 2012; Accepted 26 July 2012

Academic Editor: Andreas Michalsen

Copyright © 2012 Katja Boehm et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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