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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 129152, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/129152
Research Article

Antioxidant, Antinociceptive, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities from Actinidia callosa var. callosa In Vitro and In Vivo

1School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
2Department of Health and Nutrition Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan
3Department of Optometry, Jen-Teh Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, Miaoli 356, Taiwan
4Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 250, Taiwan
5Department of Chinese Pharmaceutical Sciences and Chinese Medicine Resources, College of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan

Received 14 August 2012; Accepted 1 October 2012

Academic Editor: Andrea Pieroni

Copyright © 2012 Jung-Chun Liao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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