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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 375671, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/375671
Research Article

Wound Healing and Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Animal Models of Calendula officinalis L. Growing in Brazil

1Laboratory of Natural Products, Pharmacy Faculty, Federal University of Goiás, 74605-220 Goiânia, GO, Brazil
2Department of General Pathology, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health, Federal University of Goiás, 74605-050 Goiânia, GO, Brazil
3Veterinary School, Federal University of Goiás, 74001-970 Goiânia, GO, Brazil

Received 1 October 2011; Accepted 14 October 2011

Academic Editor: Esra Küpeli Akkol

Copyright © 2012 Leila Maria Leal Parente et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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