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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 476457, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/476457
Research Article

Effects of Electroacupuncture of Different Frequencies on the Release Profile of Endogenous Opioid Peptides in the Central Nerve System of Goats

College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China

Received 25 July 2012; Revised 11 September 2012; Accepted 15 September 2012

Academic Editor: Wolfgang Schwarz

Copyright © 2012 Li-Li Cheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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