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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 595710, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/595710
Research Article

Getting Started with Taiji: Investigating Students Expectations and Teachers Appraisals of Taiji Beginners Courses

1Institute of Complementary Medicine KIKOM, University of Bern, Imhoof-Pavillon, Inselspital, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
2Department of Psychology, University of Bern, Biological and Health Psychology, Alpeneggstraße 22, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
3Institute of Sport Science, University of Bern, Alpeneggstraße 22, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
4Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Therapy, University Hospital Bern, Inselspital, 3010 Bern, Switzerland

Received 9 August 2012; Accepted 10 October 2012

Academic Editor: Hans-Christian Deter

Copyright © 2012 Marko Nedeljkovic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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