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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 623753, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/623753
Research Article

Anxiolytic Effects of Flavonoids in Animal Models of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

1Department of New Drug Evaluation, Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing 100850, China
2The 4th Ward of Psychiatry Department, The 261th Hospital of the People's Liberation Army, Beijing 100094, China
3Clinical Laboratory, The 261th Hospital of the People's Liberation Army, Beijing 100094, China

Received 23 August 2012; Revised 5 November 2012; Accepted 20 November 2012

Academic Editor: Yao Tong

Copyright © 2012 Li-Ming Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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