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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 636848, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/636848
Research Article

Attenuation of TRPV1 and TRPV4 Expression and Function in Mouse Inflammatory Pain Models Using Electroacupuncture

1Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
3Acupuncture Research Center, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
4Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
5Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
6School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan

Received 27 August 2012; Revised 15 October 2012; Accepted 18 October 2012

Academic Editor: Shao Li

Copyright © 2012 Wei-Hsin Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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