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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 820415, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/820415
Research Article

Dietary Crocin Inhibits Colitis and Colitis-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice

1Division of Palliative Care and Department of Internal Medicine, Tokai Central Hospital, 4-6-2 Sohara-Higashijima-cho, Kakamigahara 504-8601, Japan
2Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagasaki International University, 2825-7 Huis Ten Bosch-cho, Sasebo 859-3298, Japan
3Department of Pathology, Murakami Memorial Hospital, Asahi University, 3-23 Hashimoto-cho, Gifu 500-8523, Japan
4Department of Pharmacy, Ogaki Municipal Hospital, 4-86 Minaminokawa-cho, Ogaki 503-8502, Japan
5Division of Cytopathology, The Tokai Cytopathology Institute: Cancer Research and Prevention (TCI-CaRP), 5-1-2 Minami-Uzura, Gifu 500-8285, Japan
6Department of Tumor Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1194, Japan

Received 5 November 2012; Revised 4 December 2012; Accepted 6 December 2012

Academic Editor: Chong-Zhi Wang

Copyright © 2012 Kunihiro Kawabata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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