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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 821307, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/821307
Research Article

Yoga Meditation Practitioners Exhibit Greater Gray Matter Volume and Fewer Reported Cognitive Failures: Results of a Preliminary Voxel-Based Morphometric Analysis

1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27708, USA
2Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27708, USA
3College of Social Work, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA
4Trinity Institute for the Addictions, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA

Received 30 August 2012; Revised 19 October 2012; Accepted 26 October 2012

Academic Editor: Chun-Tao Che

Copyright © 2012 Brett Froeliger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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