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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 853516, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/853516
Research Article

Interstitial Fluid Flow: The Mechanical Environment of Cells and Foundation of Meridians

Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Shanghai Research Center of Acupuncture, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433, China

Received 5 July 2012; Revised 3 October 2012; Accepted 20 October 2012

Academic Editor: Wolfgang Schwarz

Copyright © 2012 Wei Yao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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