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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 873175, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/873175
Review Article

Emerging Glycolysis Targeting and Drug Discovery from Chinese Medicine in Cancer Therapy

School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Estates Building, 10 Sassoon Road, Hong Kong

Received 31 December 2011; Revised 28 May 2012; Accepted 12 June 2012

Academic Editor: Francesca Borrelli

Copyright © 2012 Zhiyu Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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