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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 878673, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/878673
Review Article

Neuroendocrine Mechanisms of Acupuncture in the Treatment of Hypertension

1Department of Anesthesiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2Department of Medicine, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA

Received 14 May 2011; Accepted 6 September 2011

Academic Editor: Fengxia Liang

Copyright © 2012 Wei Zhou and John C. Longhurst. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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