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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 140467, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/140467
Review Article

Control Group Design: Enhancing Rigor in Research of Mind-Body Therapies for Depression

Virginia Commonwealth University, School of Nursing, 1100 East Leigh Street, Richmond, VA 23298, USA

Received 19 November 2012; Revised 21 February 2013; Accepted 13 March 2013

Academic Editor: Vernon A. Barnes

Copyright © 2013 Patricia Anne Kinser and Jo Lynne Robins. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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