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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 152727, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/152727
Research Article

Body-Efficacy Expectation: Assessment of Beliefs concerning Bodily Coping Capabilities with a Five-Item Scale

Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 10098 Berlin, Germany

Received 14 August 2013; Accepted 18 September 2013

Academic Editor: Pradeep Visen

Copyright © 2013 Lena Schützler and Claudia M. Witt. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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