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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 471659, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/471659
Research Article

Aqueous Extract of Paeonia lactiflora and Paeoniflorin as Aggregation Reducers Targeting Chaperones in Cell Models of Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3

1Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taipei 10507, Taiwan
2Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan

Received 29 October 2012; Accepted 19 January 2013

Academic Editor: Carlo Ventura

Copyright © 2013 Kuo-Hsuan Chang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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