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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 607134, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/607134
Research Article

A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effects of Yoga on Stress Reactivity in 6th Grade Students

Department of Physical Therapy, Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus, One University Plaza, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA

Received 17 October 2012; Revised 3 January 2013; Accepted 6 January 2013

Academic Editor: I-Min Liu

Copyright © 2013 Marshall Hagins et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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