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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 879845, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/879845
Research Article

Bee Venom Mitigates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity by Regulating CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells in Mice

1Department of Physiology, College of Oriental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoeki-Dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
2Department of Internal Medicine, College of Oriental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
3Institute of Oriental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoeki-Dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea

Received 27 August 2012; Revised 17 December 2012; Accepted 26 December 2012

Academic Editor: Bashar Saad

Copyright © 2013 Hyunseong Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Cisplatin is used as a potent anticancer drug, but it often causes nephrotoxicity. Bee venom (BV) has been used for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, and its renoprotective action was shown in NZB/W mice. However, little is known about whether BV has beneficial effects on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and how such effects might be mediated. In the present study, the BV-injected group showed a significant increase in the population of Tregs in spleen. Although there was no significant difference in the numbers of Tregs 3 days after cisplatin injection between the BV- and PBS-injected groups, more migration of Tregs into the kidney was observed 6 hours after cisplatin administration in BV group than in PBS group. In addition, BV-injected mice showed reduced levels of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal tissue damage, proinflammatory cytokines, and macrophage infiltration into the kidney 3 days after cisplatin administration. These renoprotective effects were abolished by the depletion of Tregs. The anticancer effect of repeated administrations of cisplatin was not affected by BV injection. These results suggest that BV has protective effects on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice, at least in part, through the regulation of Tregs without a big influence on the antitumor effects of cisplatin.