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Economics Research International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 401928, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/401928
Review Article

R&D Direction and North-South Diffusion, Human Capital, Growth, and Wages

Faculdade de Economia, Universidade do Porto and CEFUP, Rua Roberto Frias, 4200-464 Porto, Portugal

Received 18 January 2011; Revised 11 April 2011; Accepted 5 May 2011

Academic Editor: Almas Heshmati

Copyright © 2011 Óscar Afonso. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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