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Economics Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 231473, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/231473
Research Article

Why Did Americans Reject Compulsory Health Insurance after WWI? An Application of the Lifecycle Model

1Department of Economics, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada S4S 0A2
2Department of Economics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4

Received 31 August 2011; Accepted 2 November 2011

Academic Editor: Thanasis Stengos

Copyright © 2012 Stuart J. Wilson and J. C. Herbert Emery. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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