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Education Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 389736, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/389736
Research Article

Action Research in Action: From University to School Classrooms

1National Louis University, Chicago, IL 60603, USA
2Department of Educational Foundations, Technology & Inquiry, National Louis University, 122 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60603, USA

Received 5 March 2012; Accepted 15 May 2012

Academic Editor: Gwo-Jen Hwang

Copyright © 2012 Maja Miskovic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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