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Education Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 710785, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/710785
Review Article

Can Adults Become Fluent Readers in Newly Learned Scripts?

Global Partnership for Education, World Bank, Washington, DC 20433, USA

Received 29 March 2012; Revised 12 July 2012; Accepted 12 July 2012

Academic Editor: Stephen P. Heyneman

Copyright © 2012 Helen Abadzi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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