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Education Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 751625, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/751625
Research Article

The Use of Solved Example Problems for Fostering Strategies of Self-Regulated Learning in Journal Writing

1Department of Psychology, Bielefeld University, P.O. Box 100131, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany
2Ratsgymnasium Bielefeld, Nebelswall 1, 33602 Bielefeld, Germany

Received 1 June 2012; Accepted 18 September 2012

Academic Editor: Maria Bannert

Copyright © 2012 Julian Roelle et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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