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Education Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 272560, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/272560
Research Article

Examining the Correspondence between Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement: A Case Study Analysis

1Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology (GSAPP), Rutgers University, 152 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8020, USA
2Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA
3Deerfield Public Schools District 109, Deerfield, IL 60015, USA

Received 14 August 2012; Revised 12 October 2012; Accepted 19 October 2012

Academic Editor: Bracha Kramarski

Copyright © 2013 Timothy J. Cleary and Peter Platten. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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