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Epilepsy Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 539567, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/539567
Review Article

Déjà Experiences in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

1Leeds Memory Group, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
2Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK

Received 30 November 2011; Accepted 29 December 2011

Academic Editor: Louis Lemieux

Copyright © 2012 Nathan A. Illman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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