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Epilepsy Research and Treatment
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 743203, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/743203
Review Article

Electroencephalogram of Age-Dependent Epileptic Encephalopathies in Infancy and Early Childhood

Division of Child and Adolescent Neurology, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First St. SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA

Received 15 May 2013; Accepted 1 July 2013

Academic Editor: Elaine Wirrell

Copyright © 2013 Lily C. Wong-Kisiel and Katherine Nickels. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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