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Genetics Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 286164, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/286164
Editorial

The Role of Epigenetics in Evolution: The Extended Synthesis

1Department of Integrative Biology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
3Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755, USA
4Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, C. S. Mott Center for Human Health & Development, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA

Received 15 December 2011; Accepted 15 December 2011

Copyright © 2012 Aaron W. Schrey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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