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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 106502, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/106502
Review Article

Psychological Issues in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Overview

1Department Psychology, College of Educational Science and Psychology, University of Isfahan, Isfahan, Iran
2Integrative Functional Gastroenterology Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Received 20 January 2012; Revised 18 April 2012; Accepted 19 April 2012

Academic Editor: P. Gionchetti

Copyright © 2012 M. S. Sajadinejad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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