About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 317125, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/317125
Clinical Study

Effect of High-Dose Oral Rabeprazole on Recurrent Bleeding after Endoscopic Treatment of Bleeding Peptic Ulcers

1Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, 65-1 Geumo-dong, Kyunggi-do, Uijeongbu City 480-717, Republic of Korea
2Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, 505 Banpo-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701, Republic of Korea
3Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Bucheon St. Mary's Hospital, 327 Sosaro, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon 420-717, Republic of Korea

Received 18 June 2012; Accepted 10 August 2012

Academic Editor: Spiros D. Ladas

Copyright © 2012 Hyung-Keun Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of high-dose oral rabeprazole versus high-dose IV PPI on rebleeding after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers. Methods. This was a two-center, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Patients with a high-risk bleeding peptic ulcer had endoscopic hemostasis and were randomly assigned to the high-dose oral rabeprazole group (20 mg twice daily for 72 hours) or the high-dose IV omeprazole group (80 mg as a bolus injection followed by continuous infusion at 8 mg/h for 72 hours). Results. The study was stopped because of slow enrollment (total n=106). The rebleeding rates within 3 days were 3.7% (2 of 54 patients) given oral rabeprazole and 1.9% (1 of 52 patients) given IV omeprazole (P=1.000). The rebleeding rates after 3 days were 1.9% and 0% (P=1.000), respectively. The surgical intervention rates were 3.7% and 0% (P=0.495), and the mortality rates were 1.9% and 0% (P=1.000), respectively. Conclusions. The effect of high-dose oral rabeprazole did not differ significantly from that of high-dose IV omeprazole on rebleeding, surgical intervention, or mortality after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers, but this requires further evaluation.