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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 473960, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/473960
Clinical Study

Is Post-ERCP Pancreatitis a Genetically Predisposed Complication?

1Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Democritus University of Thrace, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, 68100 Dragana, Greece
2Department of Medical Laboratories, Alexandreio Technological Institute of Thessaloniki, 57400 Thessaloniki, Greece
3Department of Radiology, Democritus University of Thrace, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, 68100 Dragana, Greece
41st Surgical Department, Democritus University of Thrace, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, 68100 Dragana, Greece
5Gastroenterology Department, George Papanikolaou Hospital, 57010 Thessaloniki, Greece

Received 16 February 2012; Revised 19 June 2012; Accepted 9 July 2012

Academic Editor: Grazyna Rydzewska

Copyright © 2012 Konstantinos Mystakidis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background/Objectives. Pancreatitis remains the most common complication of ERCP. History of post-ERCP pancreatitis is an independent risk factor for a new episode, suggesting a genetic background. The N34S mutation in serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK 1) gene may downregulate the threshold for the development of pancreatitis. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the presence of this mutation among patients with post-ERCP pancreatitis. Methods. During a period of four years, thirty patients with post-ERCP pancreatitis entered the study. Patients and procedural data were collected, focusing on risk factors for pancreatitis. Blood samples were taken for genetic testing for the presence of N34S mutation in SPINK 1 gene. After DNA extraction, we used an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction as an initial screening method for the N34S mutation, and in order to confirm the results and to determine the hetero- and homozygosity genotype status, we used a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. Results. None of the thirty patients was found to carry the N34S mutation, with both of the applied methods. Patients had an average of two of the known risk factors. Conclusion. SPINK1 N34S mutation does not seem to play a role in post-ERCP pancreatitis, but larger studies needed to confirm our results.