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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 217695, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/217695
Clinical Study

Usefulness of Magnifying Endoscopy with Narrow-Band Imaging for Determining Tumor Invasion Depth in Early Gastric Cancer

1Department of Gastroenterology, Toranomon Hospital, 2-2-2 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8470, Japan
2Department of Gastroenterology, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

Received 22 April 2012; Accepted 10 December 2012

Academic Editor: Guido Schumacher

Copyright © 2013 Daisuke Kikuchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Backgrounds. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (ME-NBI) has become essential for determining tumor margin in early gastric cancer (EGC). Here, we investigated the usefulness of ME-NBI for assessment of invasion depth in EGC. Methods. For 119 patients who had undergone ME-NBI and en bloc resection by endoscopic submucosal dissection, three physicians prospectively examined high-magnification ME-NBI images for clinical features such as presence or absence of dilated vessels (D vessels). Cases with D vessels verified by at least two physicians were assigned to group V, and others were assigned to group N. We then compared clinicopathological factors associated with the groups. Results. Groups V and N consisted of 18 and 101 patients, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, gender, tumor size, tumor location, gross morphology, or histological type. The percentage of submucosal cancer was 9.9% (10/101) in group N and significantly higher at 33.3% (6/18) in group V ( ). When the presence of D vessels was considered a diagnostic criterion for submucosal cancer, diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were 81.5, 37.5, and 88.3%, respectively. Conclusions. The results suggest that identification of D vessels using ME-NBI can assist in the assessment of invasion depth in EGC.