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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 504816, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/504816
Research Article

Changes in Ghrelin-Related Factors in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Rats

1Tsumura & Co., Tsumura Research Laboratories, 3586 Yoshiwara, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-1192, Japan
2Department of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15 W7 Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638, Japan
3Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, Division of Pharmasciences, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, N12 W6 Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812, Japan

Received 21 December 2012; Revised 5 March 2013; Accepted 9 March 2013

Academic Editor: Ping-I Hsu

Copyright © 2013 Miwa Nahata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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