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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 691026, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/691026
Research Article

Dietary Intake and Risk for Reflux Esophagitis: A Case-Control Study

1Department of Clinical Nutrition, Tongji Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai 200065, China
2Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai 200065, China
3Department of Preventive Medicine, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092, China
4Department of Gastroenterology, Tongji Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai 200065, China

Received 17 October 2012; Revised 25 March 2013; Accepted 25 March 2013

Academic Editor: P. Marco Fisichella

Copyright © 2013 Ping Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Specific dietary components have been associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Europe and the United States. However, the relationship between dietary components and GERD in Chinese still remains unclear. Methods. A total of 268 patients who were newly diagnosed as reflux esophagitis (RE) in Outpatient Endoscopy Center of Tongji Hospital were recruited. In addition, 269 sex- and age-matched subjects were also recruited as controls. The body measurements were determined, and the dietary intake during the previous year was evaluated using food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association between nutrients and RE. Results. After adjustment for WC, WHR, total energy intake, and demographics, there were a positive dose-response relationship between RE and calcium, meat, oils, and salt and a negative dose-response relationship between RE and protein, carbohydrate, calories from protein (%), vitamin C, grains and potatoes, fruits, and eggs. Conclusion. High intake of meat, oils, salt, and calcium is associated with an increased risk for RE while high intake of protein, carbohydrate, calories from protein (%), vitamin C, grains and potatoes, fruits, and eggs correlates with a reduced risk for RE.