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Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 473846, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/473846
Research Article

The Application of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in an Infant Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

1Department of Neonatology, Soochow University Affiliated Children’s Hospital, Suzhou 215003, China
2Department of Intervention, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
3Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China
4Department of Medical Imaging, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China

Received 13 February 2014; Revised 19 June 2014; Accepted 19 June 2014; Published 1 July 2014

Academic Editor: Peter V. Draganov

Copyright © 2014 Xueping Zhu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) to investigate the activated region associated with visceral pain in the brains of infant rats in a model of IBS. Sixteen newborn rats were randomized into an IBS model group and a control group. Those in the IBS group were separated from their mothers and were mechanically immobilized and had rectal sensitization with mustard essential oil for 1 week. The control group had no treatment. After 2 weeks, balloon catheters were inflated with 5 or 10 mL of air in the rectums of both groups. BOLD-fMRI was performed and the data analyzed by imaging software. In the IBS model group, rectal stimulation with 5 mL air distension activated the anterior cingulate cortex, insula cortex (IC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and thalamus, while 10 mL air significantly activated the ACC, IC, PFC, and thalamus in the model, but not controls. IBS model group was hypersensitive to visceral stimulation by rectal balloon inflation. The major brain areas participating in visceral sensation included the IC, PFC, and thalamus.