About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 951957, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/951957
Research Article

Mast Cells Density Positive to Tryptase Correlates with Angiogenesis in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Patients Having Undergone Surgery

1Department of Medical and Surgery Sciences, Clinical Surgery Unit, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia” Medical School, Viale Europa, Germaneto, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
2Surgery Unit, National Cancer Research Centre, Giovanni Paolo II, 70100 Bari, Italy
3Health Science Department, Pathology Unit, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia” Medical School, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
4Department of Medical and Surgery Sciences, Cardiovascular Disease Unit, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia” Medical School, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
5Interventional Radiology Unit with Integrated Section of Translational Medical Oncology, National Cancer Research Centre, Giovanni Paolo II, 70100 Bari, Italy
6Chair of Pathology, “Aldo Moro” University of Bari, 70100 Bari, Italy

Received 23 March 2014; Accepted 19 May 2014; Published 4 June 2014

Academic Editor: Niccola Funel

Copyright © 2014 Michele Ammendola et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. G. Ranieri, A. Labriola, G. Achille et al., “Microvessel density, mast cell density and thymidine phosphorylase expression in oral squamous carcinoma,” International Journal of Oncology, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 1317–1323, 2002. View at Scopus
  2. G. Ranieri, M. Ammendola, R. Patruno et al., “Tryptase-positive mast cells correlate with angiogenesis in early breast cancer patients,” International Journal of Oncology, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 115–120, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. N. Weidner, J. P. Semple, W. R. Welch, and J. Folkman, “Tumor angiogenesis and metastasis—correlation in invasive breast carcinoma,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 324, no. 1, pp. 1–8, 1991. View at Scopus
  4. J. P. Kankkunen, I. T. Harvima, and A. Naukkarinen, “Quantitative analysis of tryptase and chymase containing mast cells in benign and malignant breast lesions,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 72, no. 3, pp. 385–338, 1997.
  5. L. Soucek, E. R. Lawlor, D. Soto, K. Shchors, L. B. Swigart, and G. I. Evan, “Mast cells are required for angiogenesis and macroscopic expansion of Myc-induced pancreatic islet tumors,” Nature Medicine, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 1211–1218, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. D. Ribatti, G. Ranieri, B. Nico, V. Benagiano, and E. Crivellato, “Tryptase and chymase are angiogenic in vivo in the chorioallantoic membrane assay,” International Journal of Developmental Biology, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 99–102, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. A. Mangia, A. Malfettone, R. Rossi et al., “Tissue remodelling in breast cancer: human mast cell tryptase as an initiator of myofibroblast differentiation,” Histopathology, vol. 58, no. 7, pp. 1096–1106, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. G. Ranieri, G. Gadaleta-Caldarola, V. Goffredo et al., “Sorafenib (BAY 43-9006) in hepatocellular carcinoma patients: from discovery to clinical development,” Current Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 19, no. 7, pp. 938–944, 2012. View at Scopus
  9. V. Goffredo, C. D. Gadaleta, A. Laterza, A. Vacca, and G. Ranieri, “Tryptase serum levels in patients suffering from hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing intra-arterial chemoembolization: possible predictive role of response to treatment,” Molecular and Clinical Oncology, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 385–389, 2013.
  10. G. Ranieri, L. Passantino, R. Patruno et al., “The dog mast cell tumour as a model to study the relationship between angiogenesis, mast cell density and tumour malignancy,” Oncology Reports, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 1189–1193, 2003. View at Scopus
  11. G. Raneri, G. Achille, G. Florio, et al., “Biological-clinical significance of angiogenesis and mast cell infiltration in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity,” Acta Otorhinolaryngologica Italica, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 171–178, 2001.
  12. M. Gulubova and T. Vlaykova, “Prognostic significance of mast cell number and microvascular density for the survival of patients with primary colorectal cancer,” Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 1265–1275, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. M. Ammendola, R. Sacco, G. Sammarco, et al., “Mast cells positive to tryptase and C-Kit receptor expressing cells correlates with angiogenesis in gastric cancer patients surgically treated,” Gastroenterology Research and Practice, vol. 2013, Article ID 703163, 5 pages, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. M. Ammendola, R. Sacco, G. Donato et al., “Mast cell positivity to tryptase correlates with metastatic lymph nodes in gastrointestinal cancer patients treated surgically,” Oncology, vol. 85, no. 2, pp. 111–116, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. Y. Ma and S. E. Ullrich, “Intratumoral mast cells promote the growth of pancreatic cancer,” Oncoimmunology, vol. 1, no. 2, Article ID e25964, 2013.
  16. Y. Ma, R. F. Hwang, C. D. Logsdon, and S. E. Ullrich, “Dynamic mast cell-stromal cell interactions promote growth of pancreatic cancer,” Cancer Research, vol. 73, no. 13, pp. 3927–3937, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. G. Ranieri, L. Grammatica, R. Patruno et al., “A possible role of thymidine phosphorylase expression and5-fluorouracil increased sensitivity in oropharyngeal cancer patients,” Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 362–368, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. K. Kondo, M. Muramatsu, Y. Okamoto et al., “Expression of chymase-positive cells in gastric cancer and its correlation with the angiogenesis,” Journal of Surgical Oncology, vol. 93, no. 1, pp. 36–42, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. D. Ribatti, A. Vacca, B. Nico et al., “Bone marrow angiogenesis and mast cell density increase simultaneously with progression of human multiple myeloma,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 79, no. 3-4, pp. 451–455, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. B. Tuna, K. Yorukoglu, M. Unlu, M. U. Mungan, and Z. Kirkali, “Association of mast cells with microvessel density in renal cell carcinomas,” European Urology, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 530–534, 2006.
  21. S. J. Galli, “Mast cells and basophils,” Current Opinion in Hematology, vol. 1, no. 7, pp. 32–39, 2000.
  22. Z. Qu, J. M. Liebler, M. R. Powers et al., “Mast cells are a major source of basic fibroblast growth factor in chronic inflammation and cutaneous hemangioma,” American Journal of Pathology, vol. 147, no. 3, pp. 564–573, 1995. View at Scopus
  23. A. Grützkau, S. Krüger-Krasagakes, H. Kögel, A. Möller, U. Lippert, and B. M. Henz, “Detection of intracellular interleukin-8 in human mast cells: flow cytometry as a guide for immunoelectron microscopy,” Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, vol. 45, no. 7, pp. 935–945, 1997. View at Scopus
  24. P. S. Thomas, D. W. Pennington, R. E. Schreck, T. M. Levine, and S. C. Lazarus, “Authentic 17 kDa tumour necrosis factor α is synthesized and released by canine mast cells and up-regulated by stem cell factor,” Clinical and Experimental Allergy, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 710–718, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. J. Sörbo, A. Jakobsson, and K. Norrby, “Mast-cell histamine is angiogenic through receptors for histamine1 and histamine2,” International Journal of Experimental Pathology, vol. 75, no. 1, pp. 43–50, 1994. View at Scopus
  26. R. J. Blair, H. Meng, M. J. Marchese et al., “Human mast cells stimulate vascular tube formation. Tryptase is a novel, potent angiogenic factor,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 99, no. 11, pp. 2691–2700, 1997. View at Scopus
  27. A. Grützkau, S. Krüger-Krasagakes, H. Baumeister et al., “Synthesis, storage, and release of vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular permeability factor (VEGF/VPF) by human mast cells: implications for the biological significance of VEGF206,” Molecular Biology of the Cell, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 875–884, 1998. View at Scopus
  28. X. Wang, X. Chen, J. Fang, and C. Yang, “Overexpression of both VEGF-A and VEGF-C in gastric cancer correlates with prognosis, and silencing of both is effective to inhibit cancer growth,” International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 586–597, 2013. View at Scopus
  29. Y. Zhao, K. Wu, K. Cai et al., “Increased numbers of gastric-infiltrating mast cells and regulatory T cells are associated with tumor stage in gastric adenocarcinoma patients,” Oncology Letters, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 755–758, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. S. Mukherjee, G. Bandyopadhyay, C. Dutta, A. Bhattacharya, R. Karmakar, and G. Barui, “Evaluation of endoscopic biopsy in gastric lesions with a special reference to the significance of mast cell density,” Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 20–24, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. M. Ammendola, V. Zuccalà, R. Patruno et al., “Tryptase-positive mast cells and angiogenesis in keloids: a new possible post-surgical target for prevention,” Updates in Surgery, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 53–57, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. B. Nico, D. Mangieri, E. Crivellato, A. Vacca, and D. Ribatti, “Mast cells contribute to vasculogenic mimicry in multiple myeloma,” Stem Cells and Development, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 19–22, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. I. Fajardo and G. Pejler, “Human mast cell β-tryptase is a gelatinase,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 171, no. 3, pp. 1493–1499, 2003. View at Scopus
  34. D. Z. Chang, Y. Ma, B. Ji et al., “Mast cells in tumor microenvironment promotes the in vivo growth of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 17, no. 22, pp. 7015–7023, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. S.-W. Cai, S.-Z. Yang, J. Gao et al., “Prognostic significance of mast cell count following curative resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma,” Surgery, vol. 149, no. 4, pp. 576–584, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. J. Tod, V. Jenei, G. Thomas, and D. Fine, “Tumor-stromal interactions in pancreatic cancer,” Pancreatology, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1–7, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  37. M. J. Strouch, E. C. Cheon, M. R. Salabat, et al., “Crosstalk between mast cells and pancreatic cancer cells contributes to pancreatic tumor progression,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 2257–2265, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  38. M. J. Strouch, E. C. Cheon, M. R. Salabat et al., “Crosstalk between mast cells and pancreatic cancer cells contributes to pancreatic tumor progression,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 2257–2265, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. M. P. Protti and L. De Monte, “Immune infiltrates as predictive markers of survival in pancreatic cancer patients,” Frontiers in Physiology, vol. 4article 210, 2013.
  40. A. Evans and E. Costello, “The role of inflammatory cells in fostering pancreatic cancer cell growth and invasion,” Frontiers in Physiology, vol. 3, article 270, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. I. Esposito, M. Menicagli, N. Funel et al., “Inflammatory cells contribute to the generation of an angiogenic phenotype in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma,” Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 57, no. 6, pp. 630–636, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. F. Erba, L. Fiorucci, S. Pascarella, E. Menegatti, P. Ascenzi, and F. Ascoli, “Selective inhibition of human mast cell tryptase by gabexate mesylate, an antiproteinase drug,” Biochemical Pharmacology, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 271–276, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. S. Mori, Y. Itoh, R. Shinohata, T. Sendo, R. Oishi, and M. Nishibiro, “Nafamostat mesilate is an extremely potent inhibitor of human tryptase,” Journal of Pharmacological Sciences, vol. 92, no. 4, pp. 420–423, 2003. View at Scopus
  44. M. Humbert, N. Castéran, S. Letard et al., “Masitinib combined with standard gemcitabine chemotherapy: in vitro and in vivo studies in human pancreatic tumour cell lines and ectopic mouse model,” PLoS ONE, vol. 5, no. 3, Article ID e9430, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. I. Marech, R. Patruno, N. Zizzo, et al., “Masitinib (AB1010), from canine tumou model to human clinical development: where we are?” Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, vol. S1040-8428, no. 13, pp. 00266–00267, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar