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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 8 (2000), Issue 3-4, Pages 184-190
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/S1064744900000260

Gynecologic Conditions and Bacterial Vaginosis: Implications for the Non-Pregnant Patient

Magee-Womens Hospital, Department of OB/GYN/RS, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh 15213-3180, PA, USA

Received 23 November 1999; Accepted 6 April 2000

Copyright © 2000 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Bacterial vaginosis is characterized by a shift from the predominant lactobacillus vaginal flora to an overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with an increased risk of gynecologic complications, including pelvic inflammatory disease, postoperative infection, cervicitis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and possibly cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The obstetrical risks associated with bacterial vaginosis include premature rupture of membranes, preterm labor and delivery, chorioamnionitis and postpartum endometritis. Despite the health risks associated with bacterial vaginosis and its high prevalence in women of childbearing age, bacterial vaginosis continues to be largely ignored by clinicians, particularly in asymptomatic women. Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. 8:184–190, 2000.