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Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 367935, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/367935
Research Article

Accuracy of an Accelerated, Culture-Based Assay for Detection of Group B Streptococcus

1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, 6411 N Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, Houston, TX 77025, USA

Received 19 October 2012; Revised 7 January 2013; Accepted 13 January 2013

Academic Editor: Patrick Ramsey

Copyright © 2013 Jonathan P. Faro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To determine the validity of a novel Group B Streptococcus (GBS) diagnostic assay for the detection of GBS in antepartum patients. Study Design. Women were screened for GBS colonization at 35 to 37 weeks of gestation. Three vaginal-rectal swabs were collected per patient; two were processed by traditional culture (commercial laboratory versus in-house culture), and the third was processed by an immunoblot-based test, in which a sample is placed over an antibody-coated nitrocellulose membrane, and after a six-hour culture, bound GBS is detected with a secondary antibody. Results. 356 patients were evaluated. Commercial processing revealed a GBS prevalence rate of 85/356 (23.6%). In-house culture provided a prevalence rate of 105/356 (29.5%). When the accelerated GBS test result was compared to the in-house GBS culture, it demonstrated a sensitivity of 97.1% and a specificity of 88.4%. Interobserver reliability for the novel GBS test was 88.2%. Conclusions. The accelerated GBS test provides a high level of validity for the detection of GBS colonization in antepartum patients within 6.5 hours and demonstrates a substantial agreement between observers.