Table 3: GBS+, penicillin-allergic patients who delivered at Magee-Womens Hospital in 2010. Comparisons between women who received appropriate antibiotic* and women who did not.

CharacteristicsReceived appropriate antibioticDid not receive appropriate antibioticP
NumberPercent (95% CI)Number Percent (95% CI)

Total (n = 135)8451
Race/ethnicity0.47
 Non-Hispanic White7285.7 (76.5–91.8)4180.4 (67.4–89.2)
 Non-Hispanic African-American1214.3 (8.2–23.5)917.6 (9.3–30.5)
 Other00.0 (0–5.2)12 (0–11.3)
Type of insurance0.05
 Private6577.4 (67.3–85.1)3160.8 (47.1–73.0)
 Medical assistance1922.6 (14.9–32.7)2039.2 (27.0–52.9)
Obstetric provider type0.7
 Private physician6172.6 (62.2–81.1)3772.5 (59.0–83.0)
 Maternal fetal medicine22.4 (0.2–8.8)12 (0–11.3)
 OB/GYN residents1416.7 (10.1–26.2)1121.6 (12.3–34.8)
 Midwife 67.1 (3.0–15.0)12 (0–11.3)
 Family practitioner11.2 (0–7.1)12 (0–11.3)
Type of antibiotics received0.006
 Cephalosporin2732.1 (23.1–42.8)1427.5 (17.0–41.0)
 Clindamycin2833.3 (24.2–44)2651 (37.7–64.1)
 Erythromycin00.0 (0–5.2)23.9 (0.3–14.0)
 Vancomycin2934.5 (25.2–45.2)713.7 (6.5–26.0)
 Penicillin00.0 (0–5.2)23.9 (0.3–14.0)

Appropriate antibiotic is defined according to 2002 CDC guidelines.
(i) Cephalosporin for patients at low risk of anaphylaxis (those who had no immediate hypersensitivity reaction to penicillin or had previously tolerated a cephalosporin).
(ii) Clindamycin or erythromycin for patients whose GBS isolates were susceptible to both of these antibiotics.
(iii) Vancomycin for patients at high or unknown risk of anaphylaxis when antimicrobial sensitivity was unknown or the GBS isolates were resistant to either clindamycin or erythromycin.