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International Journal of Agronomy
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 935463, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/935463
Research Article

Corn-Soybean Rotation Systems in the Mississippi Delta: Implications on Mycotoxin Contamination and Soil Populations of Aspergillus flavus

1Biological Control of Pests Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA
2Crop Genetics Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA
3Crop Production Systems Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA

Received 23 December 2011; Revised 29 February 2012; Accepted 19 June 2012

Academic Editor: Kent Burkey

Copyright © 2012 Hamed K. Abbas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The effect of corn-soybean rotation on mycotoxin contamination in corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill.) grains has not been fully evaluated. Therefore, this research investigated the effect of corn-soybean rotation on aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination in respective grains. The results showed that aflatoxin levels in soybean averaged 2.3, < 0 . 5 , 0.6, and 6.8 ng/g in 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008, while corn aflatoxin levels were 16.7, 37.1, 2.4, and 54.8 ng/g, respectively. Aspergillus flavus colonization was significantly greater ( 𝑃 0 . 0 5 ) in corn (log 1.9, 2.9, and 4.0 cfu/g) compared to soybean ( < 1 . 3 , 2.6, and 2.7 cfu/g) in 2005, 2007, and 2008, respectively. Aflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates were more frequent in corn than in soybean in all four years. Higher fumonisin levels were found in corn (0.2 to 3.6 μg/g) than in soybean ( < 0 . 2 μg/g). Rotating soybean with corn reduces the potential for aflatoxin contamination in corn by reducing A. flavus propagules in soil and grain and reducing aflatoxigenic A. flavus colonization. These results demonstrated that soybean grain is less susceptible to aflatoxin contamination compared to corn due to a lower level of colonization by A. flavus with a greater occurrence of non-aflatoxigenic isolates.