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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 204623, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/204623
Research Article

Chinese-Language Montreal Cognitive Assessment for Cantonese or Mandarin Speakers: Age, Education, and Gender Effects

1Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
2Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
3Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
4Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
5Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 15 January 2012; Revised 24 April 2012; Accepted 4 May 2012

Academic Editor: Hiroko H. Dodge

Copyright © 2012 Ling Zheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The Montreal Cognitive Assessment Chinese-Language Los Angeles version (MoCA-ChLA) was developed and administered during an in-home interview to 1,192 participants (mean age 62.5 years, mean education 11.6 years) in a population-based Chinese American Eye Study (CHES) in Los Angeles. The MoCA-ChLA score (mean ± SD) was 23.8±4.2 with little ceiling and no floor effects. The score increased with higher education, decreased with advancing age, and was not related to gender. Compared to the education 1–6 years group, the mean MoCA-ChLA score was 2.6 and 4.6 higher in the education 7–11 and 12–20 years groups, respectively. The Mandarin- (n=612) and Cantonese- (n=612) speaking subgroups performed comparably; Cronbach's alpha of the MoCA-ChLA score was 0.78 and 0.79 for these two groups, respectively. Item response theory analysis showed good discriminating power for executive function and memory. These properties support the MoCA-ChLA as a useful screening tool for aging and dementia studies for Mandarin or Cantonese speakers.