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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 685739, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/685739
Research Article

Microglial Amyloid- 𝜷 1-40 Phagocytosis Dysfunction Is Caused by High-Mobility Group Box Protein-1: Implications for the Pathological Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease

1Department of Clinical and Translational Physiology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414, Japan
2Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602-8566, Japan
3Department of Neurology, Mie University, Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu 514-8507, Japan
4Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, S1W16, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8543, Japan

Received 30 November 2011; Accepted 24 February 2012

Academic Editor: Akio Suzumura

Copyright © 2012 Kazuyuki Takata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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