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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 752894, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/752894
Review Article

Lysosomal Fusion Dysfunction as a Unifying Hypothesis for Alzheimer's Disease Pathology

Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

Received 2 June 2012; Revised 1 August 2012; Accepted 2 August 2012

Academic Editor: Wiep Scheper

Copyright © 2012 Kristen E. Funk and Jeff Kuret. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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